What Are the Functions of the Skin? | Biodermis.com

Tyler Szelinski
The skin is the largest organ in the human body that supports a number of bodily functions related to our immune system, sensory perception, and homeostasis of the body. The skin consists of three main layers, in addition to a number of sublayers, that all perform different actions that all play a role in keeping us healthy. As we go through some of these important functions, we will gain a better understanding for why we should maintain our skin and keep it healthy for as long as we age.

Read more →

Can Scars Heal on Their Own? | Biodermis.com

Tyler Szelinski
A common question many patients ask after surgery is if their scar will heal on its own or if medical intervention is required. The short answer: it depends. More than likely, a scar will never completely go away, especially if it was caused by an invasive procedure or major injury. On the other hand, if you are healing from a minor wound, you may get lucky and be left with a barely visible mark. A number of factors, including genetics and how well you treat your wound, can determine how your scar will turn out. Luckily, there are a number of things we can do to help our scars fade over time.

Read more →

The Most Common Surgeries That Leave Scars | Biodermis.com

Tyler Szelinski
The average person will likely experience an invasive surgical procedure at some point in their lifetime, especially as they get older. While many types of surgeries are becoming more advanced and minimally-invasive, there are still a number of major surgeries that leave scars on the body. Usually, scarring is the least of a person’s worries when heading in for surgery. However, months or years later, the scar will remain and serve as a constant reminder of the procedure.

Read more →

Treating Facial Scars Vs Body Scars | Biodermis.com

Tyler Szelinski
All scars are the result of the same wound healing process that involves four distinct stages: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and maturation. Scarring is part of the maturation stage of wound healing marked by the reformation and strengthening of collagen fibers in new scar tissue. Scar tissue can continue to heal and change for up to a year or longer after the wound has fully healed. Even though scars all follow the same process, there are different approaches to treating them based on which part of the body they develop. Facial scars have their own set of challenges compared to scars that form elsewhere on the body.

Read more →

The Most Common Skincare Concerns | Biodermis.com

Tyler Szelinski
Over the past few years, the skincare and cosmetics industry has grown tremendously, targeting the needs of a diverse population with new concerns. These concerns often range in severity, from moderate to severe. The more severe problems should be examined by a dermatologist, but some over the counter remedies may be available to allay certain symptoms. Furthermore, much of what the consumer skincare market offers to the public are solutions for purely cosmetic issues, not ones that require urgent care and prescription medication. However, depending on what your specific concerns and needs are, you may be surprised what remedies are available to consumers.

Read more →

Why Do Scars Change Color? | Biodermis.com

Tyler Szelinski
There are a number of reasons why your scar might change color over time, or why some scars appear different than others. The color of a scar depends on a number of factors including wound severity, genetics, skin type, and environmental factors. It is important to understand that there is no normal range of color for scars. Everyone’s skin heals differently, and that means scars can turn out in a myriad of different shapes, sizes, textures, and colors. Luckily, all scars follow the same wound-healing stages and can be treated using the same methods.

Read more →

Probiotics and Skin Care | Biodermis.com

Tyler Szelinski
Probiotics are living microorganisms that inhabit our bodies and play a vital role in digestion and overall well-being. Probiotics also help the good bacteria that can be found in abundance on the surface of the skin. The bacteria on the skin, referred to as skin flora, protect us from invading pathogens and help keep our skin pH levels in balance. In recent years, probiotics have become a popular item for consumption through certain foods and dietary supplements. The skin care market has even seen an influx of moisturizers, lotions, and serums that contain probiotics. While probiotics are gaining traction in the skin care market, it remains to be seen if they are truly beneficial for your skin or if it’s just a new trend.

Read more →

When and How to Treat Your Scars After Surgery | Biodermis.com

Tyler Szelinski
Medical silicone gel for scar therapy is now the post-operative standard for most patients after their surgery. However, once patients obtain their scar products through their physician or online, they often have concerns regarding treatment best practices. Most often, patients want to know when is the best time to start using silicone gel for their scars and how to use it most effectively. In this article we will address some of the more common concerns that post-op patients have.

Read more →

Reconstructive vs Cosmetic Plastic Surgery and Scar Care | Biodermis.com

Tyler Szelinski
The term plastic surgery derives its name from the Greek word “plastikos,” which means to shape or mold. Plastic surgery encompasses a wide range of procedure types that include both cosmetic and reconstructive surgery. Generally speaking, reconstructive surgery aims to restore functionality and normal appearance to a visible part of the body. Cosmetic surgery, on the other hand, aims to enhance certain bodily features to appear more aesthetically pleasing. While both surgery types might seem similar at first glance, there are notable differences in terms of their end goals.

Read more →

Diabetes-Related Skincare Problems | Biodermis.com

Tyler Szelinski
Diabetes can cause a wide-range of problems for the body, including complications with the skin. In fact, in some cases, skin issues are often the first sign that a person has diabetes. Some of these problems are ones that anyone can have, but diabetes can increase the risk. Luckily, most of these conditions can be treated if caught early on. Other problems that can be a little more serious are most common in people with diabetes. These include diabetic dermopathy, necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum and diabetic blisters, among others.

Read more →